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  • Expert Advisory Assistance/Consultations

    Get expert advisory assistance and consultations for all your property and Business management needs with ANI’s Meta-management. Whether you’re facing tenant issues, maintenance challenges, or just need guidance on improving the value of your property, our team of experts is here to provide you with the support and solutions you need.

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  • AN.I.'s Unquestioned Answers: What is a Data Broker? and Why?

    Published by: Animatrics Industries (AN.I.) & Mr. Genaro Soto Introduction A data broker is a company or organization that collects and analyzes data from various sources to create detailed profiles of individuals or groups. These profiles are then sold to other companies for various purposes, such as targeted marketing, risk assessment, and decision-making. Eligibility requirements to work as a data broker may vary depending on the company or organization. However, common qualifications may include a background in data analysis, information technology, statistics, or a related field. Strong analytical skills, attention to detail, and knowledge of data privacy laws and regulations are also essential for working in this role. Data brokers are companies or individuals that collect, analyze, curate, and sell data about consumers to third parties. This data often includes personal information such as names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, and more detailed attributes including purchasing habits, social media activity, credit history, and even personal interests. The primary role of data brokers is to amass vast amounts of data from various sources, package it, and sell or lease it to other companies for marketing, risk mitigation, and consumer insight purposes. Roles and Responsibilities Data Collection: Data brokers gather information from numerous sources, including public records (e.g., birth certificates, marriage licenses, and court documents), commercial sources (e.g., subscription lists, loyalty programs, and credit reports), and online activities (e.g., social media interactions, search histories, and website cookies). Data Analysis and Curation: They analyze and process the collected data to identify patterns, profiles, and segments. This involves cleaning the data, ensuring it is up to date, and sometimes even enriching the data by combining different data sets to create comprehensive profiles. Data Packaging and Selling: Data brokers package the analyzed data into useful formats for various clients, including marketers, retailers, insurance companies, and financial institutions. This data assists businesses in targeting advertising, improving customer services, and developing products. Privacy Management and Compliance: With increasing awareness and regulation around data privacy (GDPR in Europe, CCPA in California, etc.), data brokers are also responsible for ensuring that their data collection and dissemination practices comply with relevant laws and standards. They must have processes in place for data subjects to exercise their rights, such as the right to opt out of data selling or to request data deletion. Data Security: Ensuring the security of the collected data is a significant responsibility. Data brokers must protect data against unauthorized access, breaches, and theft, as such incidents could lead to severe privacy violations and legal repercussions. Data Sharing & Profile Building: Creating detailed profiles of individuals or groups based on the analyzed data. Selling or providing access to the compiled profiles to clients or third party organizations. Eligibility Requirements Eligibility requirements for becoming a data broker vary by jurisdiction but generally include: 1. Legal Compliance: Must comply with local, national, and international laws related to data protection, privacy, and commerce. 2. Data Security Measures: Implement robust data security measures to safeguard collected data. 3. Transparency: Often required to register with a regulatory body and may need to disclose their data collection and selling practices. 4. Ethical Standards: Adherence to ethical standards is increasingly becoming a requirement, where data brokers must ensure that their practices do not exploit or harm individuals. 5. Technical Capacity: Possessing the technical capacity to handle large data sets securely and efficiently is essential. The specifics can vary widely depending on the region and the nature of the data being handled. In some areas, there might be specific licensing requirements or registrations needed to operate legally as a data broker. The years of experience required to work as a data broker can vary depending on the specific job requirements set by the company. In general, entry level positions may require 02 years of relevant experience, while more senior roles or positions with higher levels of responsibility may require 35 years or more. As for starting your own data brokerage firm, here is a general step by step process you can consider based on industry research and best practices: 1. Research and Planning: Conduct market research to understand the demand for data brokerage services. Identify your target market and potential clients. Define your business model, including the types of data you will collect and sell. 2. Legal and Regulatory Compliance: Understand data protection laws and regulations, such as GDPR, CCPA, and others. Obtain any necessary licenses or permits required to operate a data brokerage firm. Develop a privacy policy and terms of service to protect customer data. 3. Data Sourcing and Collection: Establish partnerships with data sources, such as public records, surveys, online platforms, and other sources. Implement data collection processes that comply with data protection regulations. Ensure data accuracy and quality control measures are in place. 4. Data Analysis and Profiling: Invest in data analytics tools and technologies to analyze the collected data. Develop algorithms and models to create detailed profiles of individuals or groups. Implement security measures to protect data from unauthorized access. 5. Client Acquisition and Sales: Develop a marketing strategy to attract potential clients to your data brokerage firm. Offer customized data solutions tailored to meet clients' needs. Establish pricing models and agreements for data sales. 6. Data Management and Security: Implement data storage and management systems to secure and organize collected data. Regularly update security protocols to prevent data breaches or cyberattacks. Comply with data privacy regulations to protect customer data. Please note that starting a data brokerage firm involves legal, ethical, and technical considerations. Consulting with legal professionals and data privacy experts is recommended to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Starting a data brokerage firm is a complex, multifaceted venture that combines technical expertise, legal knowledge, marketing acumen, and strategic partnerships. Data brokers collect, aggregate, analyze, and sell data related to consumer behaviors, preferences, and demographics. The required years of experience can vary widely depending on the specific role within the brokerage firm, but for leading or starting the company, a deep understanding of the industry, which often comes with several years (often 510 years) of experience in data science, IT, marketing, or a related field, is crucial. Here is a step by step process to start your own data brokerage firm, highlighting key considerations and actions. Understand the Industry Research: Study the current market, including major players, emerging trends, and regulatory landscape. Identify the type of data you plan to broker (consumer, business, specialized) and understand its sources, applications, and value. Gain Necessary Experience and Skills Develop or Hire Expertise: Gain experience in data analysis, database management, cybersecurity, and privacy laws. Consider higher education or certifications in data science, analytics, or a related field if you’re starting afresh. Build a team with complementary skills in IT, legal compliance, sales, and marketing. Legal Considerations and Compliance Regulatory Compliance: Familiarize yourself with data protection laws (GDPR in Europe, CCPA in California, etc.). Register your business and obtain necessary licenses or permits. Develop a comprehensive privacy policy and data handling practices to ensure ethical use of data. Business Planning and Strategy Business Plan: Create a detailed business plan outlining your business model, target market, value proposition, revenue streams, and financial projections. Decide on whether you’ll source data, analyze existing data, or both. Funding: Assess your startup costs and determine your funding strategy (personal savings, loans, investors). Acquiring Data and Tools Data Acquisition: Establish partnerships or agreements with organizations from where you’ll source your data. Ensure all data is acquired ethically and legally, with proper consent where necessary. Technology: Invest in or develop the technology needed to collect, store, process, and analyze large datasets securely. Consider cloud storage solutions, advanced analytics software, and robust cybersecurity measures. Sales and Marketing Building a Customer Base: Identify your primary customers (businesses, marketers, researchers) and how you’ll reach them. Develop a marketing strategy that highlights the quality, exclusivity, or unique insights of your data. Establishing Operations Operational Setup: Set up your office space (if not operating remotely) and IT infrastructure. Implement processes for data management, customer support, and sales. Continuous Improvement and Networking Growth and Learning: Stay abreast of technological advancements and regulatory changes in the data industry. Continuously improve your data collection and analysis methods. Network with industry professionals to stay connected to emerging needs and opportunities. Starting a data brokerage firm entails navigating technical challenges, ethical considerations, and regulatory compliance issues. Success in this industry requires a keen understanding of both the data landscape and the companies that rely on this data to make informed decisions. By following these steps and staying committed to ethical data practices, you can establish a successful data brokerage business. The data brokerage industry is a sector within the broader data market that involves the collection, analysis, and sale of data from various sources for commercial purposes. Data brokers compile extensive databases of consumer information, demographic data, behavioral patterns, and other details from both online and offline sources. Some well known data brokerage companies include Acxiom, Experian, Equifax, and CoreLogic. These companies collect data from a variety of sources, such as public records, surveys, social media, online activities, and more. The data is then analyzed to create detailed consumer profiles that can be sold to businesses for targeted marketing, risk assessment, and decision making purposes. The data brokerage industry has come under scrutiny in recent years due to concerns about data privacy, security, and the ethical use of consumer information. Regulatory bodies such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in the United States and the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) have introduced guidelines and regulations to govern the collection and use of personal data by data brokers. As the industry continues to evolve, businesses operating in the data brokerage sector are increasingly focusing on transparency, consent based data collection, and data anonymization to address privacy concerns and build trust with consumers. For more in depth information and specific citations, I recommend consulting industry reports, academic journals, and reputable sources that cover data brokerage and related topics. The data brokerage industry involves companies that collect, aggregate, analyze, and sell data about consumers and businesses. These brokers gather information from a wide range of sources, including public records, online activities, purchase histories, and social media profiles. The industry plays a critical role in the digital economy, supporting targeted marketing, risk assessment for financial services, personalized content, and more. Key Players: Some of the major players in the data brokerage industry include Acxiom, Experian, and Equifax. These firms are well known for their expansive databases that cover a vast swath of the consumer population globally. Regulatory Environment: The industry operates in a complex regulatory environment. In the European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) imposes strict guidelines on how personal data can be collected, stored, and used. In the United States, the regulation is more fragmented, with sector specific laws such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) for health information, and state level laws like the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Challenges and Criticisms: Data brokers have faced criticism for issues related to privacy, consent, and transparency. Concerns have been raised about the extent of data collection without direct consumer awareness, potential inaccuracies in data, and the security of personal information, highlighted by instances of data breaches affecting major data brokers. Industry Trends: The industry is evolving with advances in technology and changes in regulatory and consumer landscapes. There's an increasing focus on ethical data practices, privacy by design principles, and the development of newer, privacy centric business models. The rise of blockchain and decentralized technologies also presents opportunities for more secure and transparent data transactions. Ethical Considerations: Ethical data brokerage revolves around consent based data collection, ensuring data accuracy, providing consumers with control over their personal information, and preventing discriminatory uses of data. For those looking to dive deeper into the subject, scholarly articles, industry reports by market research firms, and legal analyses available through academic and legal databases provide valuable insights. Additionally, regulatory bodies and privacy advocacy organizations often publish guidelines, reports, and policy papers that are highly informative. Remember, given the rapid pace of change in technology and regulation, it's crucial to consult the most current resources to get an accurate picture of the data brokerage industry.

  • Exploring Income Streams in Internet Marketing and Digital Real Estate: AN.I.'s Income Stream Comprehensive Analysis

    Published By: Mr. Genaro Soto (Animatrics Industries) The digital revolution has transformed the economic landscape, creating new opportunities for income generation, particularly in the realms of Internet Marketing and Digital Real Estate. This research paper delves into eight potential income streams in these fields, outlining their characteristics, potential benefits, and challenges. The aim is to provide a comprehensive understanding of these income opportunities and guide prospective digital entrepreneurs in making informed decisions. Keywords: Internet Marketing, Digital Real Estate, Online Income, Digital Entrepreneurship Introduction: Digital Income Generation With the advent of the Internet and the digitalization of various industries, new avenues for income generation have emerged. Among these, Internet Marketing and Digital Real Estate stand out, offering a plethora of opportunities for savvy entrepreneurs. In this paper, we examine eight potential income streams within these sectors, providing an overview of how they operate and the potential benefits they offer. Internet Marketing Internet marketing, also known as online marketing, involves the use of the internet to promote products and services. Various strategies fall under this umbrella, each offering different income opportunities (Chaffey & Ellis-Chadwick, 2019). 1. Affiliate Marketing: This involves promoting others' products or services and earning a commission for any sales made through your referral link. It's a popular income stream due to its low entry barrier and scalability (Patel, 2020). 2. Content Marketing: This strategy involves creating and sharing valuable free content to attract and convert prospects into customers, and customers into repeat buyers. Monetization can occur through various means, including advertising revenue, sponsored content, and lead generation (Pulizzi, 2012). 3. E-commerce: Selling products or services online, either directly or through platforms like Amazon or eBay, constitutes a significant income stream. With the global e-commerce market size projected to grow exponentially, the potential for income is substantial (Zhu, 2020). 4. Consulting and Online Courses: Leveraging personal expertise to provide consulting services or create online courses is another viable income stream. Platforms like Udemy, Coursera, or self-hosted websites can facilitate this (Belleflamme et al., 2014). The Value of Digital Real Estate in Today's Market Digital real estate involves owning and managing digital properties, including domains, websites, and social media accounts. Just like physical real estate, digital properties can be monetized in several ways (Rogers, 2018). 5. Domain Flipping: This involves buying domain names at a lower price and selling them at a profit. The value of a domain name can increase substantially if it is unique, easy to remember, or has SEO potential (Liu et al., 2011). 6. Website Flipping: Similar to domain flipping, this involves buying, improving, and selling websites for profit. Income can also be generated by monetizing the website through advertising, subscription fees, or e-commerce while it is under your ownership (Rogers, 2018). 7. Ad Revenue from Owned Websites: Owning a website with high traffic can generate income through advertising. Platforms like Google AdSense make it easy to display ads and earn revenue on a pay-per-click or pay-per-impression basis (Kumar et al., 2019). 8. Social Media Accounts: High-traffic social media accounts can be monetized through sponsored posts, advertising, or affiliate marketing. Influencers often use these methods to generate income (Freberg et al., 2011). Conclusion The advent of the digital age has ushered in a plethora of new income opportunities. Internet marketing and digital real estate offer various income streams, from affiliate marketing and e-commerce to domain and website flipping. By understanding these opportunities, entrepreneurs can position themselves to take advantage of the digital economy's potential. References Belleflamme, P., Omrani, N., & Peitz, M. (2015). The Economics of Crowdfunding Platforms. Information Economics and Policy, 33, 11-28. Chaffey, D., & Ellis-Chadwick, F. (2019). Digital marketing: strategy, implementation, and practice. Pearson UK. Freberg, K., Graham, K., McGaughey, K., & Freberg, L. A. (2011). Who are the social media influencers? A study of public perceptions of personality. Public Relations Review, 37(1), 90-92. Kumar, A., Bezawada, R., Rishika, R., Janakiraman, R., & Kannan, P. K. (2019). From social to sale: The effects of firm-generated content in social media on customer behavior. Journal of Marketing, 83(1), 7-25. Liu, D., Brass, D. J., Lu, Y., & Chen, D. (2015). Friendships in online peer-to-peer lending: Pipes, prisms

  • AN.I.'s Props to You: Digital Real Estate And Prop-technological Investments

    Published By: Mr. Genaro Soto (Animatrics Industries) Introduction: What proptech investments? How are they relevant to you? WELL I'M GLAD NOBODY ASKED! I'll be happy to explain it to everyone for no reason. Proptech, short for property technology, refers to the application of technology and innovation to the real estate industry. Proptech investments involve allocating capital to companies and startups that develop technologies and digital solutions aimed at enhancing various aspects of real estate, including property management, tenant experience, investment analytics, construction, and more. Here's a deeper look into proptech investments and the areas they cover: 1. Property Management Solutions: - Proptech companies develop software platforms and tools to streamline property management processes, including rent collection, maintenance requests, lease management, and tenant communication. - These technologies aim to improve operational efficiency for property owners, managers, and tenants while also providing real-time insights into property performance. 2. Tenant Experience and Engagement: - Proptech investments may focus on enhancing the tenant experience through digital solutions that offer amenities booking, community engagement platforms, and personalized services to improve resident satisfaction and retention. - Technologies such as smart access control systems and IoT (Internet of Things) devices can also contribute to a more seamless and secure living experience for tenants. 3. Real Estate Analytics and Data Management: - Proptech solutions encompass data analytics platforms that enable real estate professionals to gain valuable insights into market trends, property performance, and investment opportunities. - These technologies leverage big data, machine learning, and predictive analytics to enhance decision-making processes for real estate investors, developers, and managers. 4. Construction Technology and Building Management: - Proptech investments extend to construction technology, including tools for project management, smart building design, and construction automation aimed at improving construction efficiency and reducing costs. - Building management technologies, such as energy management systems and smart building solutions, optimize the operational performance of real estate assets, leading to cost savings and sustainability benefits. 5. Real Estate Investment and Transaction Platforms: - Proptech encompasses digital platforms for real estate investment, crowdfunding, property listing, and transaction management, facilitating easier access to real estate investment opportunities and streamlining property transactions. - Technologies such as blockchain and tokenization are also disrupting the real estate investment landscape by enabling fractional ownership and increasing liquidity in real estate markets. 6. Sustainability and Environmental Technologies: - Proptech investments often include sustainable real estate technologies focused on energy efficiency, renewable energy integration, smart HVAC systems, and waste management solutions to align with environmentally conscious practices and regulatory requirements. Proptech investments appeal to real estate fund managers and investors seeking to capitalize on the transformative potential of technology within the real estate sector. By backing proptech companies and solutions, fund managers aim to enhance the operational efficiency, performance, and sustainability of real estate assets while also adapting to changing consumer and market demands. When evaluating proptech investments, fund managers consider factors such as the scalability and market potential of the technology, the team's expertise, potential regulatory and market adoption challenges, as well as the impact on property performance and investor returns over time. Furthermore, the due diligence process involves thoroughly assessing the value proposition, competitive landscape, and growth prospects of proptech companies before making investment decisions. Get Involved in Proptech Investing: There are several reputable sources and industry reports that provide valuable insights into the latest trends and developments in the proptech sector. Here are some recommendations for obtaining information on proptech trends and getting involved in proptech investing: 1. Industry Reports and Publications: - CB Insights: CB Insights offers comprehensive reports and analysis on proptech trends, market dynamics, and investment activity. Their research provides in-depth coverage of emerging technologies and disruptive trends in real estate. - Deloitte: Deloitte's real estate industry reports often include sections dedicated to proptech, offering insights into key trends, market opportunities, and investor perspectives on technology-driven innovation in real estate. - KPMG: KPMG's publications on real estate and proptech provide diverse perspectives on innovation, market outlook, and investment trends within the proptech landscape. 2. Proptech Events and Conferences: - Attending proptech-focused events and conferences can provide firsthand exposure to industry trends and networking opportunities with proptech startups, investors, and industry experts. Events such as MIPIM Proptech, CREtech, and Proptech conferences organized by industry associations offer valuable platforms for learning about the latest innovations and investment opportunities in proptech. 3. Proptech Incubators and Accelerators: - Exploring proptech-focused startup accelerators, such as MetaProp or Pi Labs, can provide access to cutting-edge proptech startups, investment opportunities, and industry expertise. These platforms often offer demo days, investor meetups, and educational resources related to proptech investing. 4. Networking with Industry Professionals: - Engaging with real estate professionals, venture capitalists, and fund managers who specialize in proptech investments can provide valuable insights and potential access to proptech investment opportunities. Networking with individuals active in the proptech ecosystem can offer firsthand perspectives on industry trends and investment considerations. Getting involved in proptech investing requires a thorough understanding of the market, emerging technologies, and investment dynamics within the real estate technology sector. Here are some steps to consider: 1. Educate Yourself: - Stay informed about proptech trends and innovations by accessing industry reports, attending events, and following proptech-focused media outlets. Understanding the intersection of technology and real estate is crucial for making informed investment decisions. 2. Evaluate Investment Opportunities: - Research and analyze proptech startups and companies seeking investment. Consider factors such as the scalability of their technology, market potential, competitive landscape, management team expertise, and the alignment of their solutions with industry challenges and trends. 3. Seek Professional Advice: - Consider seeking guidance from financial advisors or investment professionals with an understanding of the real estate and technology sectors. They can provide insights into proptech investment opportunities, due diligence processes, and potential risks associated with investing in emerging technologies. 4. Explore Investment Vehicles: - Evaluate proptech investment opportunities through venture capital funds, real estate-focused technology accelerators, or real estate-specific funds that allocate capital to proptech startups. Additionally, some real estate investment trusts (REITs) and real estate funds may incorporate proptech-related assets within their portfolios. 5. Consider Your Risk Tolerance: - Understand the risks associated with investing in proptech. While proptech offers opportunities for innovation and potential returns, it also involves the risks inherent in emerging technologies, market adoption challenges, and regulatory considerations. 6. Diversify Your Portfolio: - If considering proptech investments, it's essential to diversify your portfolio to manage risk. Consider how proptech investments align with your overall investment strategy and objectives, considering factors such as asset allocation, risk tolerance, and investment horizon. Conclusion: Proptech investments continue to play a significant role in reshaping the real estate industry, driving innovation, and creating new opportunities for investors to participate in the digital transformation of real estate. The evolving landscape of proptech will likely influence how real estate fund managers diversify their portfolios and integrate digital assets alongside traditional physical properties. Ultimately, getting involved in proptech investing requires a blend of industry knowledge, due diligence, and a strategic approach to capitalizing on technology-driven innovations within the real estate sector. By staying informed about proptech trends and opportunities, leveraging industry resources, and potentially seeking professional advice, individuals can explore investment avenues within the dynamic landscape of proptech. ANIMATRICS INDUSTRIES: E-COMMERCE Published by: Mr. Genaro Soto Copyright © 2023 Animatrics Industries All Rights Reserved. DISCLAIMER: No claim is made to the exclusive right to use “INDUSTRIES” apart from the mark as shown.

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  • Mr. Genaro Soto (FO)

    Mr. Genaro Soto (FO) EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND Alfred University - Data Research & Experimental Psychology (BA) - Minor Of Association - Criminal Justice Studies & Sciences - Aug 2014 - Jan2019 Coursera Data Science, Web Design, Database, & Business Management Jan 2019- Present Real Estate U - Real Estate/Property Management - Jun 2023 - Mar 2024 WORK EXPERIENCE Animatrics Industries Founder Self-employed 1 yr 4 months United States · Hybrid Property Manager Dec 2022 - Present 1 yr 4 months United States · Remote Researcher Dec 2022 - Present 1 yr 4 months United States · Remote Socio-Therapist Cardinal McCloskey Community Services Aug 2019 - Present 4 yrs 8 months United States · Hybrid SKILLS: Business Management Sales & Marketing Business Analysis Research & Development financial Forecasting Operations Management Data Analysis Analytical Skills Statistical Data Analysis Experimental Clinical Research Psychological Experimentation Research Facilitation Data Analysis Data Science Fundamentals (Python & SQL) Real Estate & Properties Real Estate Economics Property Management Systems AN.I.'S FOUNDER Throughout my life, there have been rare occasions when I have not exploited some form of a system to my advantage. From visiting the game store to jot down cheat codes and utilizing backroads as shortcuts to even feigning illness to avoid school, I have engaged in various tactics for personal gain. I would like to highlight my most successful experience, which occurred during my freshman and sophomore years of college in the study hall. Due to mandatory attendance, I noticed that the study hall provided useful resources such as free printing and an abundance of school supplies, including notepads and post-it notes, in the adjacent office room. Additionally, students were granted access to the storage area to replenish supplies as needed. With this knowledge, at the beginning of each semester, when college students were expected to spend hundreds of dollars on textbooks for their new courses, I strategically befriended individuals who had the financial means and had already purchased textbooks. I then borrowed these textbooks and meticulously photocopied hundreds of pages from each book, covering all the required course material. As a result, I saved hundreds of dollars during those semesters by fulfilling the mandatory study hall requirement without incurring the significant cost of purchasing textbooks. WHAT STARTED AN.I.

  • Terms & Conditions | Legal Disclaimer | ANI's Metamanagement

    AN.I.'s Company Terms & Conditions AN.I. LEGAL DISCLAIMER Animatrics Industries: Property Management & E-commerce - 2023 Copyright - All Rights Reserved. DISCLAIMER: No claim is made to the exclusive right to use “INDUSTRIES” apart from the mark as shown. to use “INDUSTRIES” apart from the mark as shown. TERMS & CONDITIONS 2.1 Acceptance By using AN.I.'s website, services, or software, users agree to these Terms and Conditions. ​ 2.2 Services AN.I. provides a range of real property technology, property/asset management, software as a service, and digital estates services. These services are subject to the following terms: Services may be modified or discontinued at any time without notice. AN.I. is not responsible for any loss or damage caused by interruptions or outages of services. Users are responsible for ensuring that their systems meet the technical requirements for using the services. ​ 2.3 Fees Fees for AN.I.'s services are as outlined on the website or in relevant agreements. Fees are payable in advance. ​ 2.4 Intellectual Property All intellectual property rights in AN.I.'s services, software, and materials belong to AN.I. Users are granted a non-exclusive, non-transferable license to use the services and software for their own purposes. ​ 2.5 User Conduct Users are prohibited from using AN.I.'s services for any illegal, unethical, or unauthorized purposes. This includes: Infringing copyright or intellectual property rights Sending unsolicited emails or spam Hacking or disrupting AN.I.'s systems Impersonating an AN.I. employee ​ 2.6 Disclaimer of Warranties AN.I.'s services and software are provided "as is" and "as available." AN.I. makes no express or implied warranties of any kind. ​ 2.7 Limitation of Liability AN.I. shall not be liable for any losses or damages of any kind, whether direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive, arising out of or related to the use of its services or software.3. Refund Policy All purchases of AN.I.'s services and software are final. There are no refunds for any reason. 4. Amendments AN.I. reserves the right to amend these Privacy and Terms and Conditions at any time without notice. Users are advised to review these terms regularly.

  • Page with information about the person

    Page with information about the person EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND Alfred University - Data Research & Experimental Psychology (BA) - Minor Of Association - Criminal Justice Studies & Sciences - Aug 2014 - Jan2019 Coursera Data Science, Web Design, Database, & Business Management Jan 2019- Present Real Estate U - Real Estate/Property Management - Jun 2023 - Mar 2024 Professional experience of the person Skills possessed by the person AN.I.'S FOUNDER Throughout my life, there have been rare occasions when I have not exploited some form of a system to my advantage. From visiting the game store to jot down cheat codes and utilizing backroads as shortcuts to even feigning illness to avoid school, I have engaged in various tactics for personal gain. I would like to highlight my most successful experience, which occurred during my freshman and sophomore years of college in the study hall. Due to mandatory attendance, I noticed that the study hall provided useful resources such as free printing and an abundance of school supplies, including notepads and post-it notes, in the adjacent office room. Additionally, students were granted access to the storage area to replenish supplies as needed. With this knowledge, at the beginning of each semester, when college students were expected to spend hundreds of dollars on textbooks for their new courses, I strategically befriended individuals who had the financial means and had already purchased textbooks. I then borrowed these textbooks and meticulously photocopied hundreds of pages from each book, covering all the required course material. As a result, I saved hundreds of dollars during those semesters by fulfilling the mandatory study hall requirement without incurring the significant cost of purchasing textbooks. WHAT STARTED AN.I.

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